• Ariel Green

Snapshot of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals with Gwen Lynn

Updated: Feb 24


Climate change is a multifold, complex issue with many causes and effects. It's a global crisis that the entire world must work together to face. In today's episode, we chat with Gwen Lynn, Environmental Scientist and Founder of In A Green Minute Environmental Safety Science Consultants. We dive into a few of the UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals, which are a call to action for all countries around the world to promote prosperity while protecting the planet.

A few of these goals include ending poverty and hunger, better education, clean water & energy, and climate action. The UN set a date of 2030 to achieve these goals, which may seem ambitious to some, but with at the rate economic inequality and natural disasters are growing, we have no choice but to escalate solving these issues.


Tune in to the podcast to learn more about these Sustainable Development Goals and how we can make an impact. Watch the video interview on YouTube


Subscribe to Gwen's YouTube Channel

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Follow Gwen on Twitter

Follow Gwen on Facebook

Follow Gwen on TikTok: @inagreenminute

Read Gwen's Greenpeace article

Discussion References:

UN's Sustainable Development Goals

NASA

GM moving to electric

LISTEN HERE: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Watch on YouTube


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TRANSCRIPTION:


Ariel:

Hello, and welcome back to The Sustainable Brown Girl Podcast. This show exists to connect black, brown and indigenous women who are interested in sustainability. Our goal is to inspire, encourage and educate each other; from gardening to thrifting, to minimalism, to veganism and everywhere in between. We're all on a journey to taking care of our bodies and our planets. I'm your host, Ariel Green. 


If you keep up with the news on the state of Earth's environment, you've probably heard that the climate is steadily rising. In fact, since the late 19th century, before the industrial revolution, the Earth's temperature has already risen 2 ℉ according to NASA. And if we do nothing to slow it, Earth's temperature is on track to rise another 1.5 ℃ or 3 ℃ by 2015. The warming temperatures mean that the ocean is warming and causing ice caps to melt, which will lead to increased sea levels. Meaning that our coastal cities could eventually be underwater. And actually, I was just reading that Indonesia is looking to move their capital of Jakarta away from the coast in the coming years because of the rising sea levels. 


What causes temperatures to rise? Well, one of the biggest factors is the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, such as carbon dioxide, which comes from fossil fuels, such as oil, gas and coal. Climate change is a multi-fold complex issue with many causes and effects. It's not quite linear, but it's all related. It is a global crisis that the entire world must work together to face. In today's episode, we'll be talking with our guests, Gwen Lynn an Environmental Scientist, about what steps are being taken to address climate change. But first, we have to read a review from one of our podcasts listeners. This one comes from a Lady T24, titled, "Love this." It reads, "The host has a relaxing presence. I find this informative without being preachy and I'm getting a better understanding of things to do to become more sustainable." Thank you so much for the review and I'm so glad that this podcast is helping you along your sustainability journey. To have your review featured on an upcoming episode, be sure to head over to iTunes and leave a review, letting me know why you love this podcast. All right now, back to the show.


Today featured Sustainable Brown Girl is Gwen Lynn. Founder of "In a Green Minute- Environmental Safety Science Consultants. "Having travelled throughout Europe and China as an environmental observer, Gwen has a deep understanding for our environment, both domestically and internationally. Her areas of expertise include worker safety, including COVID-19 and respirators, as well as air, water, soil monitoring and emerging green technology. Thank you so much for joining us today Gwen. 


Gwen:

Thank you for having me. I'm really happy to be here. 


Ariel:

Let's jump right into your journey and how you became interested in sustainability. 


Gwen:

I guess I became interested in sustainability by default. I am an environmental scientist, and even though that's what I did academically, I still think that taking care of the earth is something that we all want. We all want clean air, clean water, clean soil, clean food. And in order to continue us to be healthy as well as animals and plants, we're all living species, we have to adapt some type of sustainable living and sustainability is simply focusing on your needs so that future generations will have those same needs met. You want to be sustainable, you want to keep going and we can do that socially by not littering, economically by electric vehicles and things like that. As well as environmentally, as I said before, by focusing on air issues, water issues, soil issues, things of that nature. I'm kind of a sustainable person by default, but I do try to it do within my personal life also. 


Ariel:

Will you tell us about your background? Like what you studied in school and what you've done for work? 


Gwen:

Sure. I wanted to be a doctor, however, those 4.0 A-averages didn't quite come my way so I ended up centering into science. Environmental science was what I majored in and my bachelor's degree at Rutgers University, go RU. And I got my master's degree at Hunter College, which is a part of City University of New York. And it's a dual master's it's environmental science and occupational health or worker safety. That's pretty much... I do both. I do environmental science, which is the clean air, clean water as well as safety or worker safety. And that's basically what I've been doing. I opened up In A Green Minute, which is the name of my company to try and advance those forces as you well know, there aren't that many environmental scientists who look like myself. I'm female, I'm black, I usually have braids in my hair and I wanted to try and propel us if I could and bring more females that looked like ourselves into the system. 


Ariel:

Representation is so important because you know, the issues that we're dealing with and then also with inspiring other people to also pursue a job in your field that maybe they wouldn't have thought about before. So it's so important. 


Gwen:

Right. 


Ariel:

I also saw on your Instagram that you've done work with Greenpeace. Can you tell us about that? 


Gwen:

Every year, well, when I was in the city right now, I'm in Florida during the pandemic with my mom, but I'm usually working up in New York and New Jersey. And every year, I do a music fundraiser usually around earth day as well as planting flowers in New York City, again on the same day, usually around earth day. And I just volunteered with them just like anybody else in New York City and I thought it was a great group, extremely diverse. We had college kids, we had senior citizens. I absolutely loved that. I love the New York City chapter. And in fact, I was able to write for them in Greenpeace Legacy just last year. I hope I get a chance to write for them again. But Greenpeace is a well-known reputable group. They're international, they're in many states here in the United States, but not every state. I wish they were in every state, but they're worldwide, they're international. Their claim to fame was stopping some of the... I think it was the whaling that was going on up around the North pole and around Alaska or whatever. And many Greenpeace people, activists got arrested. They were okay, they were bailed out or whatever, but Greenpeace's is...They do the job, they get the job done. And I hope when we get back to normalcy, I'll be able to work with New York again because that's a good group and they really go out and try and focus with the people and talk to the people. I love Greenpeace. 


Ariel:

Wow. That sounds like a great opportunity and hopefully, you can work with them more. One of the things that I really wanted to talk to you about today Gwen is the UN sustainable development goals. So for anyone who hasn't heard of these UN SDGs, as they're called, in 2015, the UN defined 17 goals, which are basically a call to action for all countries around the world. And these goals will promote prosperity while protecting the planet. A few of these goals include ending poverty and hunger, better education, clean water and energy, and reducing inequality. We're going to talk about some more of them in detail but I want to get your opinion on this Gwen. The UN set a date of 2030 to achieve these goals and to most of us, it probably sounds ambitious, but with the rate of economic inequality and natural disasters growing, we really have no choice but to escalate solving these issues. So what's your take on it? 


Gwen:

Yeah, pretty much the same. People say to me all the time, "Oh, we're not going to be able to do this. Oh, we're not going to be able to do that." And I'm like, "Well, you know what? We really don't have a choice. We really don't have a choice. We don't want to have our backs to the wall." And the way I like to say it is, "Either we do this is the easy way, or we're going to do it the hard way, either way, it's going to get done. So do you want to have seven feet of water in your living room through floods or a fire lapping at your door, either way, it's going to get done." So, yeah, with the SDGs, the sustainable development goals, the UN proposed this extremely ambitious system where the countries can have all of these goals, there's 17 and they can work on each of them. 


And the first benchmark is 2030 with the next one, I think being 2050. And another way to think about the SDGs is they're also called desired targets or desired outcomes. And like you said, there's no hunger, there's zero poverty. We were talking about this, so I wrote a bullet list. The clean water, sanitation, climate action, life on land, life below water. And they use the #Envision2030, which I absolutely love, #Envision2030, which is right around the corner. I mean, it sounds really far away, but it's only in nine years. We've lost a bit of time under the Trump administration. However, we're going to have to try and make up that time. And I think with the United States more closely involved now on the international scale, when it comes to these SDGs, the sustainable development goals, I think that will, in some ways, fine-tune what we need to do and get everybody else in the race, get everybody else. And it is a race and may the best man or woman win. But however, when one wins, we all win. And that's the great thing about the SDGs. I'm really happy to be learning more about them. Hopefully, I'll get a chance to be involved more with them, but every little thing you do helps, like this podcast. 


Ariel:

Exactly. Let's talk about a few of them and maybe what they mean and perhaps some actions that we can take to meet those goals. The first one we'll talk about is goal number three, which is good health and wellbeing. This is to ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages. Can you give us a little bit more information about what that means and how we can achieve that? 


Gwen:

Sure. I like that one because that's one that we can all do. Good health and wellbeing. Shanna Ferrigno; she is a friend from LA that I interviewed for my podcast and also the daughter of Lou Ferrigno, the incredible host. She has a company called Ferrigno Fit and she goes out, she works out a lot, she's always in nature and I've always admired her because she's able to take that those actions and relate it to you and me. She's not going out that much now cause he's about to expect twins. But again, I always just loved that part about her going out. And even with wellbeing, something as simple as smiling or laughing. You can tell if I am smiling.


Ariel:

Yeah, you can.


Gwen:

If I'm angry at somebody and that's one thing that I try and do, even with strangers, I try and smile because that makes me feel better and it makes the other persons feel better, even if it's underneath a mask. I've had the advantage, the honor really of partnering with a company, "Mothers & Others for Clean Air" and then go out and they advocate for things like clean air because, we all know we need clean air, but no one's really doing anything about it. And that's one of the basic things that you want for good health, including clean water. You know all about the Flint, Michigan. I'm sure you heard about the lead contamination, that whole situation that's up there. Thank goodness now, two people have been charged but it's something that's simple that can throw your whole life. And 12 people I think died as a result of that. So when it comes to good health and wellbeing, that's extremely important. And again, that's something that we can all do. We can all take charge of for ourselves. 


Ariel:

Definitely. Eating better foods, exercising, and also ensuring hopefully that you can have access to clean air and water. 


Gwen:

Yes. 


Ariel:

So the next goal is goal number six, which is a continuation of this. This is for clean water and sanitation. "Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all." Can you talk some more about that? 


Gwen:

That's a big one. Clean water and sanitation. Let me see. There are a few diseases, some big ones - chlorea, dysentery, and one of the hepatitis. They are all passed to via bad sanitation and bad water. So, especially now during Coronavirus, we're often asked to keep washing our hands. Of course, we can use hand sanitizer, but hand washing with soap and water is much more effective to get your hands as clean as they can be. So clean water and sanitation...I always think about areas in Ghana or areas even... Even in my lifetime, my grandmother didn't have a working bathroom inside the house, we had an outhouse, okay. They got a bathroom inside the house in the 70s, but it just goes to show you sometimes it's not always accessible to all. And that is one thing that I think the UN is striving to do is to make sure these extremely basic things that we need to sustain ourselves as humans are accessible to all. I even think about... I can't remember exactly where it was, but it was a girls school in Africa and they didn't have an indoor bathroom and girls, we have flow and we need to have access to clean water. Of course, we'll make do, we have to do whatever we have to do, but it's much better. And I remember when they got that indoor bathroom, it was a beautiful thing and it was good for the girls because you know what they were doing when they had their one week period? They were staying home.


Ariel:

And missing school.


Gwen:

Clean water and sanitation is definitely a necessity and I'm glad the UN picked up on that. 


Ariel:

Exactly. Yeah. Because from our standpoint, of course, we live in America and for most people, we have access to clean air and water. And we don't always think about how these other developing countries don't have access and how it can affect us too. Seeing people in India, living on these rivers that have trash running through it, you think that it's just bad for them, but it's bad for everyone because those also lead to the ocean and it can mess up the water system for everyone. So, it is important for not just the first world countries, but also the developing countries to have access to those necessities as well. 


Gwen:

And on that note, I've always said there's... I think there are seven major gyers where the plastic floats in the ocean. And well, unfortunately for them, I don't know if you want to say fortunately for us, but a lot of them are in the Indian ocean. So they have to deal with this on that side of the world and a lot of it might be our plastic and Europe's plastic and Africa's plastic that's floating out there. If those guys existed on the East or the West coast, then we would deal with it because we'd be seeing it, but we don't, however, it does exist. And what I always say is what goes around, comes around, eventually, it will somehow impact us. 


Ariel:

Yeah, exactly. I mean, we already see plastic in our fish and all that stuff so it is definitely affecting us, but we don't visually see it. 


Gwen:

Correct. 


Ariel:

The next goal we can talk about is goal number seven, which is, "Affordable and clean energy." This is to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. What can you tell us about that one? 


Gwen:

Yeah, that's another good one. And that's one that I'm thinking as we go along here in America, we'll get more used to that terminology and more used to the technology. I remember when I went to Europe and I flew from here obviously over to France and looking at all of the... I could see the wind turbine farms and the solar energy farms and I was astounded. I was like, "Oh my God." And then when I got to Germany, I asked my friend, "Why is there so much here? I see so many on the homes. So many solar energy farms." He's like, "Well Gwen, Angela Merkel, 10 years ago, the prime minister or the president there, she went out and she did like a tax incentive for businesses and residences. If you put these things up, we will pay you or pay you back." Or however, they worked it out so there was a financial advantage and we haven't gotten there yet. Hopefully, with these initiatives and with the new government administration that we have then we will get to that point, but we just haven't gotten there yet. 


One of my favorite cars in the world is Tesla. I love electric vehicles. They're just too expensive. They're too expensive for the average Joe Schmoe. I know Elon Musk is working on it and I know there are a few versions that are coming out that I think... Not with Tesla, I think what another manufacturer that is starting around 20,000, which is a bit more easier for the average person trying to afford. That's one of my things too is I go around talking with different people and manufacturers and distributors, when it comes to sustainable brands and products, they have to be affordable. If you're selling something and it's great that it's made out of reused plastic or whatever, but the average person can't afford it. What good is it? That's a big thing on my list and I'm glad we're talking about it today. 


Ariel:

Yes, exactly. Affordability is so important because the more people that can jump on board, the quicker that we're able to get to our goals. 


Gwen:

Exactly. And the more people that buy it and use that service, the lower the price goes. 


Ariel:

Yeah, that true. 


Gwen:

They have to work hand in hand. 


Ariel:

Exactly. I think I saw somewhere that GM is looking to offer several different options for electric vehicles and they're looking to phase out their gas vehicles too within... I want to say by 2025, but definitely by 2030. I can't remember exactly.


Gwen:

Yeah. I remember seeing that too and I think Joe Biden said that the GM, the that provide the federal vehicles so that's why it's a little easier for them to go that route with them directly. But yeah, the more that that come out, the easier it will be and the cheaper it will get. I love green technology. 


Ariel:

Yes. And on the note of solar and wind technology, I remember I went to Colorado a few years ago and a lot of people had solar on their houses and I do believe I also saw a few solar farms too. If we can get, like you said, more initiatives to encourage people to place those farms, then that would be really helpful. 


Gwen:

Yes agreed.


Ariel:

Next is goal number 11. This is for sustainable cities and communities. This is to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable. What does a sustainable city look like? 


Gwen:

A sustainable city I think looks like, let's see... It can be a building, multi-levels, but it has, like we said, solar panels or maybe it's connected to a wind farm, which is on the edge of the city, or usually a lot of times they put them in water. There'll be lots of green spaces. And in terms of green spaces, like either lawns or even up in New York, they'll put up a green space up in the roof or they'll have vines growing up the building. And LEEDs( Leadership and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Designs) there with the US green building council. I think they're headquartered in DC and I've had a chance to work with them a little bit, I hope to work with them more, but they go out and certify these buildings when they have sustainable design. That's what a sustainable city will look like. Also, I don't know if I mentioned it to you via email or whatever before, but when I went to China... Yes, I did tell you, I went to China. It was the first time that I saw a two flush toilet. Now I didn't know what it was, but there was a flush on the left and then a flush on the right. And it turns out one flush on the left is for number one. And the two flushes are a little bit stronger for number two. Now that's called water efficiency. And I was shocked because I'd never seen it in the United States and this was in China. Things like that you can incorporate in and hopefully you'll get recognized by the LEEDs(Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), maybe not. But one thing I can tell you is that sustainable buildings, sustainable companies, they frequently are resold at a higher value, they frequently get tax incentives and another thing that they do is they go out and talk to their tenants about what it is that they're doing and how this has benefiting them. And I think that is really important when it comes to outreach and making people aware that these things were done, whether it's water efficiency, energy efficiency, the green spaces that we were talking about, letting people know that this is what they're doing and then hopefully they can incorporate that in their lives. Even if it's a one flush to flush. Do you know what I mean?


Ariel:

I know right. It's really clever. I think also too, you mentioned at one point when we were talking previously about San Francisco, have they started implementing some sustainable city practices? 


Gwen:

Well, there's a few... Portland, San Francisco as well as Atlanta. I know the West coast is extremely progressive environmentally. I mean, for them it's, it's no big deal. I don't know how they got that way, but they did. And even Atlanta, I think they're going to as far as their buses are going to electric buses and there are a few things that Atlanta is doing and can't remember exactly what other than the buses. I think Atlanta and San Francisco are going to end up being kind of like your prototype cities. The Mercedes stadium, that's in Atlanta, right? 


Ariel:

It is.


Gwen:

 That is recognized by LEEDs. I think they have gold or platinum certification and hopefully one day I'll get a chance to go out there and see it even more up close. I've only been there once, but I didn't get a chance to really tour it. 


Ariel:

Yeah. I've been there once too for a soccer game, but I didn't know that they were LEED-certified and that they had green technology there so yeah, I'm like, I will have to go and check that out further. 


Gwen:

Absolutely. Let's go together. Let's do it. 


Ariel:

That would be awesome. Now the last one I want to talk about is goal 13, which is climate action. This is to take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. Do you have any ideas on ways that they're going to try to achieve this? 


Gwen:

I think it was on MSNBC just maybe last week or the week beforehand that was watching Greta Thunberg and Michael Mann. I know you know who Greta Thunberg is and if you don't know who Michael Mann is, he's a climatologist, a scientist and author and he's written quite a few books. And the two takeaways that I got from it with respect to climate action is, Greta Thunberg kept saying...she said it multiple times during the cast that we are not treating this as a crisis. "We are not treating this as a crisis." And she just kept saying that over and over. And the thing that I took from Professor Mann is he said, "Climate deniers are on the fringe." And that's a good thing because initially, during my bachelor's learned about climate change, people were laughing at the scientists. They're like, are you kidding? It's 32° outside, there is no such this as global warming. But now 20, 30 years later, we see what is actually going on. Climate deniers are not on the fringe. I mean, they're still on the fringe, but most people understand and do believe that climate change is actually happening. And again, the UN is taking it upon themselves to really go into this and really make this predominant in terms of their SDGs. Unfortunately, I do think that even though most people believe in climate change, I don't think they understand it yet. And that is one thing that's up to the scientists and even regular people to try and explain to people, to bring them into the group. I think it was Patty Smith who wrote the song, "People have the power." And people truly do have the power to make change. 


Gwen:

And as long as they understand it and they understand what people are talking about, they have the power and we can make that change. I also think about islands like Fiji and even Hawaii. They're losing their land and the only inhabit so much. But they're losing their land due to land erosion And that is another consequence of climate change. And of course, California, there are just so many examples. And again, I think people sometimes get stuck and say, "Well, what do we do?" And my answer is you start small. And another thing is, I think the goal is to keep temperatures down by 1.5, they always say 1.5 centigrade. s you don't want the difference to be over 1.5. So when you hear 1.5 Celsius or centigrade that equals 2.7° F, 2.7° F is almost three degrees And that is huge! Especially when you talk like freezing at 32, there is a huge difference between 32 and 35. 32 you freeze, 35 you don't. So again, when, when you start to talk about this and realize this, there's more that we can tell the people in a very easy way, but we have to try and do our best because we don't have a choice, we have to try. 


Ariel:

Exactly. And like you said, climate deniers are on the fringe now and people are starting to understand at least what climate change means and also kind of see the effects of it. Although most of us may not experience on a day-to-day like," This is an effective climate change," but at least you're more familiar with it. And I think that's definitely one of the goals of this podcast is to present this information to people in an easy to understand way and give them tips on how to help make a difference in their own personal lives. 


Gwen:

Another thing that I use, you can see my little world here, my little ball. The easiest way to explain climate action, global warming is just the mathematical expression. As if today it's 70° and tomorrow is 72°, on the average, it got warmer by 2°. That's global warming, but climate action is basically the rest of it. So I'm saying, the North pole, the South pole, these are both melting and as they melt, where's that water going? That water's going all across the globe. So my thing is, again, do you want to take action when you have seven feet of water in your living room or there's fire lapping at the back of your door? Hopefully, under the guidance of the UN and under the guidance of some really cool scientists, another one is Katharine Hayhoe and Michael Mann, and Greta Thunberg; even though she's not a scientist yet, the world is listening to her. If they're listening to her, that's a good thing. I don't care if she's 13 and 14 years old, what difference does it make? But the message is getting across. 


Ariel:

Exactly. Just having more people know about it and learn about it is definitely going to make a difference over time. 


Gwen:

Yes. 


Ariel:

You mentioned the best way to make a difference is to start small. What are some small changes that people can make? 


Gwen:

Okay. So just a few months ago, Vote! "We all need to vote." And if you don't know, ask somebody, ask somebody you trust. I always say, "if you really don't know, you can vote for yourself". I mean, be counted, that's one thing. The other thing is, try to learn as much as you can, even if you're just Googling stuff about SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals). One thing I recently learned when it comes to no hunger, no poverty, we waste something like 40% food. When mom says, "Eat all the food on your plate," that's probably coming from an old-time saying because there are people starving in the world and we waste a lot of food, that's one thing. Another thing to try and help with climate change, it's a complicated story, but eat less meat. I'm not saying go vegan because not everybody wants to or can go vegan, but I say, "try to eat less meat." We do what Meatless Mondays on Monday, or at least one day a week, eat less meat and that does directly help lower your carbon footprint. Buy locally things like that. I am a big, big proponent of indoor plants...


Ariel:

Oh yeah.


Gwen:

I really think that this and activities or interactions like this are key for people to understand what we mean about climate action and what we mean about SDGs. You bring a plant in the home, it's green, it's pretty, what does it do? It absorbs, it breathes like I do and when you breathe out, you breathe out carbon dioxide, that's a C and two oxygens. He does the exact same thing. He emits carbon dioxide and some of that oxygen that attached to the carbon, they go back into the air, as well as he purifies the air. And to me, this is a direct comparison or parallel to the earth. If I take care of this plant, it will take care of me. It's a de-stressor, it cleans the air, it puts oxygen back into the air and it's the same thing with this beautiful globe [inaudible 34:32] earth. If we take care of the earth, it will take care of us. It's taken this earth millions of years to get to the balancing point that it's at, yet it's taken a preindustrial, a couple of hundred years for humans to already have a detrimental effect on this. And this is what the earth is doing, it's symptomatic, it's feeling a little sick and I'll tell you one thing, regardless to how it goes, when it comes to this earth, it will take care of itself, except humans may not be here to see it. So I'd kinda like to be here, I'd like for my ancestors and our future generations to be here. But that is what we're looking at because it will take care of itself and it will do what it needs to do, but humans may not be around to experience it. What else can we do? I'm a huge anti-litter nut, please don't litter. Litter doesn't have anything directly to do with sustainability but it does have something to do with our environment because when you litter, even if it's one piece, it may decompose, but more than likely, it will not. Especially if it's plastic, it'll end up more than likely going into a water stream, a lake or river an ocean we were talking about gyers earlier. And then, if it does decompose, it's going to decompose in that water stream, fish, turtles, plants, they're going to end up absorbing it if it decomposes at all, or it's going to end up in a gyer system or somewhere where we don't want it to end up. And or if it does end up in a landfill, I think it was China who just recently, I think it was last year or the year before close their biggest landfill, 25 years early. 


Ariel:

Wow!


Gwen:

Yeah, because it already got packed and they had to close it down and that's why, China is really trying to go non-plastic at least that's what they're trying to do, they're trying to be a little bit more progressive. But I don't want that to be any other country or the United States that landfills are just overflowing and no state wants to take anybody else's garbage. So that's another thing that we can do and that's all I can think of.


Ariel:

That was great. Those are some great first steps. Hopefully, you're taking notes or listen to the podcast again. All right, Gwen. Thank you so much for coming on today. Tell everyone where they can find you. 


Gwen:

Yes. you can find me on social media @inagreenminute just like in a New York minute or #inagreenminute. And my name is Gwen Lynn, environmental scientists. Can I tell you about the hoodies that we just got in? 


Ariel:

Please do. 


Gwen:

I have a little picture of it. Yeah. I was asked to do some sweatshirts with a hood and hopefully, if you want one, you can order one. Just let me know. As well as in February, in celebration of black history month, I'm going to be doing some free consultations on respirators. This is a half based, which I don't think we're going to need, but these are N95 and so I just want to offer to people because I've done it already and people have asked. If they have questions on N95s or KN95s or using a scarf, I can help them out, so I will be offering about five minutes, it's all you need. Free consultations for February. Just hit me up at In A Green Minute and I'm more than happy to help people out there. 


Ariel:

Perfect. Thank you so much. Please go follow her. She offers some great information on her Instagram page and as we know, she will be doing more in the future. 


Gwen:

 All the social media, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. They're all under In A Green Minute. Let me know how you're doing guys. And I want to thank you so much for doing this. This is fantastic. 


Ariel:

Yeah. Thank you so much for joining us. 


Thank you so much for listening to The Sustainable Brown Girl podcast. Be sure to subscribe and share it if you loved it and leave a review. You can find us on Instagram @sustainablebrowngirl and check out our Facebook community. We would love to have you there. Until next time, let's continue to make healthy choices for the health of our planet and the health of our bodies. Thanks for listening.