• Ariel Green

Secondhand Shopping and Ethical Fashion Brands with Tyler Chanel

Updated: Oct 19, 2020


In today's episode of Sustainable Brown Girl, we talk to Tyler Chanel, an ethical fashion model and creator of the blog and youtube channel, Thrifts and Tangles, which focuses on thrift shopping, natural hair, and sustainability. As a long time thrifter, she shares tips on how to navigate thrift stores and the importance of shopping ethical fashion brands. 


Follow Tyler on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thriftsandtangles/

Subscribe to Tyler's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/thriftsandtangles

Check out Thrifts & Tangles Blog: http://thriftsandtangles.com/


Resource for ethical & sustainable clothing brands: https://www.thegoodtrade.com/features/fair-trade-clothing

The True Cost Documentary: https://truecostmovie.com/



LISTEN HERE: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play

Transcription:


Ariel:

Hello and welcome back to The Sustainable Brown Girl Podcast. This show exists to connect black, brown and indigenous women who are interested in sustainability. Our goal is to inspire, encourage and educate each other. From gardening to thrifting, to minimalism, to veganism and everywhere in between. We're all on a journey to taking care of our bodies and our planet. I'm your host, Ariel Green.


In the last 20 years, fast fashion brands such as Forever 21, Zara and Fashion Nova; just to name a few, have become popular for offering trendy clothing for a cheap price. The true cost of these clothes created for short-term use are being paid by the exploitation of black and brown women and children around the world and of course, imposes negative environmental impacts. One of the first and probably easiest steps for many people who are transitioning to a more sustainable lifestyle is to quit fast fashion and start thrifting or shopping secondhand. In today's episode of Sustainable Brown Girl, we talked to Tyler Chanel and ethical fashion model and creator of the blog and YouTube channel; Thrifts and Tangles, which focuses on thrift shopping, natural hair and sustainability. As a long time thrifter, Tyler shares tips on how to navigate thrift stores and the importance of shopping, ethical fashion brands.


Ariel:

Thank you so much for joining us, Tyler.


Tyler:

Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here today and to talk about these topics with you.


Ariel:

Yay. Let's just jump into it. The first question I have is how did you get started on your sustainability journey?


Tyler:

I got started on my sustainability journey... Let me first of all say, my mom is the thrifting queen. She has been trying to get me to thrift since... I remember being five years old and going to goodwill and I was not interested in buying anything or like eight years old, whatever in elementary school and we'd always go to Goodwill and my favorite store back then was Ross and I'm like, "Can we just go to Ross? Why are we at Goodwill?" She was very frugal, she loved garage sales and just all that things. I did go to garage sales with her as a kid and I really enjoyed those. She introduced that really early on in my life but it wasn't until, I think it was my senior year of high school a Savers thrift store opened up down the street from our house and that was my mom and I's favorite activity to do together. We would go to the thrift store once a week, my aunt would come with us and we would just have such a fun time shopping and buying things secondhand. And at the end, we'd show each other what we bought, it was just a really fun bonding time and it was a great way to like be more sustainable. But during that time, I didn't even realize. I didn't realize anything about the sustainability aspect of it. I was just shopping there because it was way less expensive than me going to the mall and then I realized that I was getting way more compliments from the outfits I was getting at the thrift store than for... They were $5 outfits versus the $50 I was spending on an outfit at the mall. I was like, "Okay, I'm going to start thrifting, this is my thing now." But, I watched the documentary, The True Cost and I feel like that's in everyone's story changes from, "I'm stopping fast fashion to becoming ethical," but that documentary really opened my eyes to the fact that the fashion industry has such a negative impact on people and the planet. And as a consumer, I felt like I could make that simple change to stop shopping fast fashion because even in high school and the beginning of college, I would still... I mostly bought things from the thrift store, but I would still buy socks from H&M if I needed socks or little things I didn't want to get from thriftstore. I would buy underwear from H&M. After watching that documentary, I said, "I'm 90% getting everything from the thrift store and then underwear and stuff, I'm going to try to find ethical options instead, from ethical brands." That was my journey with that.


But then, my mom and aunt and I had an unhealthy thrifting addiction, it was like a five minute drive. Once a week to the thrift store went to twice a week to the thrift store to three times a week at a thrift store to okay, let's go to the thrift store where we're going to hit up 10 thrift stores in Vegas and we we're buying so much stuff. We were going to the Goodwill outlets. I don't know. Do you guys have that where you live that Goodwill outlet center?


Ariel:

Yeah, there's one here.


Tyler:

Oh my goodness. We would go there once a month. I would buy at least 50 pounds of clothes for $10.


Ariel:

Wow!


Tyler:

I [inaudible 05:05::] found my favorite places, I had all of this stuff, didn't think anything of it and then I read Marie Kondo's book; The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. I read that and she's talking about things should bring you joy and all this stuff. And I was like, "Oh my gosh, I'm a monster! None of this stuff brings me joy." Because I was on YouTube and whatnot, I really felt like I had to thrift constantly. I felt like I needed to always have like a thrift hall video because that was my most popular videos and I felt like I had to shop every month and I wasn't wearing most of clothes and that book lit up a light bulb in my head. And I was like, "Okay, I need to slow my roll." A lot of the clothes I wasn't wearing, I was like, "I don't want to send this right back to the thrift store because it's just pointless at that. Why did I take it from the thrift store to send it back and they might end up in landfills." I started hosting my own clothing swaps in Vegas and I would open them up to the public and all of the stuff... My mom and I both realized we had a problem. I made my mom declutter, I decluttered and we had enough stuff between the two of us where we were able to fill up all of the racks at our clothing swaps. I was like, "No one needs to bring clothes, I just want people to take [inaudible 06:46] get rid of our stuff in a more ethical way and my mom and I started doing... I don't know if my mom did it, but I started doing thriftmas, and I told my friends, this year, you're getting a bag of stuff from my closet that I bought from a thriftstore that I never wore and it's catered to your style and my friends were loving it. It was crazy. My friends would come to my house, take clothes from my... It was just a problem. That's my whole rabbit hole with sustainability. I started just doing it because it was inexpensive and then I realized thrifting is more sustainable if you do it correctly. And then through Maria Kondo's book, I realized I have to be more mindful and conscious about my purchases. Now I'm currently at the point where I thrift when I need something and I only try to buy what I need and I'm trying to implement this into more aspects of my life as well, besides just fashion. That's the whole crazy story.


Ariel:

That was great. I loved it. I can totally relate with thrifting with your mom and aunts, because my mom and aunts or a couple of my aunts are really into thrifting and garage sales. When I was younger, we would go along with them and it was okay until I got to be in middle school and stuff and I'm like, "This isn't cool anymore." But around that was around the time in the early 2000s when route 21 and Forever 21 were coming out and it's like, "Well I can buy cheap clothes that are still fashionable and you really go into that rabbit hole and it hasn't been more until recently that I stopped with the fast fashion too. But anyway, the clothing swaps. First of all, how did you set that up? I'm really interested.


Tyler:

The clothing swaps are so fun. The way I set it up is, I worked for a wedding event venue in Vegas and I had a relationship with the lady who rented out the rooms. I rented out one of the rooms and then I just had it. I brought in clothing racks and I had tables set up and basically, you would walk in, it looked like it was set up like a little store. And so my boyfriend was actually... I had him run "checkout." If you would bring a bag of clothes, let's say you had five items you wanted to swap, you would go check in with my boyfriend, give him the items, he would give you five tickets and that would be like your cash and then you go through the shop and you could try on clothes, there was a fitting room set up, there was snacks and drinks and it was so much fun because you could see people fall in love with the items that you no longer love and you can have a whole conversation. You can say, "This is how I styled it and ask them how they plan on wearing it." And it's just so cool to see that you're extending the life of your clothing and someone who genuinely loves it is going to take it home. I've had swaps... I usually try to have them once a season and it's so cool to me because typically the same people come to my swaps, but it's so cool because I'll see an item that came from a swap like two years ago. It'll be at that swap again two years later and I'm just like, this is awesome!


Ariel:

That's awesome


Tyler:

You don't like it anymore, but someone else can take it. They're so much fun. I love them so much.


Ariel:

Yeah. Wow. That's amazing. I see a lot of talk about ethical brands on your blog and your Instagram. Can you explain what makes a brand ethical?


Tyler:

Sure! Ethical for ethical fashion or ethical brands in general, ethical is really an umbrella term and a lot of terms fall under it. For me personally, I think an item is ethical if they are eco-friendly, meaning they're made out of products that are... raw materials that are sustainably sourced or they're not making a huge negative impact on the planet. There's also fair trade, which means the workers were paid fair wages and they're getting treated fairly, they're getting benefits and that focus is more so on the employee's wellbeing. And then there's sustainability, which is really items that are designed to be long lasting and to have an overall low impact on the planet. And I think that's more of a long-term version of eco-friendly, but a lot of them overlap. But for me, I really prefer to buy items... An item could be eco-friendly, but it could also not be fair trade. The item can use materials that are good for the earth, but the workers weren't paid fairly. For me, an item is truly ethical when it is good for the planet. And it's good for the workers as well, or it doesn't negatively impact the people making the items.


Ariel:

Yeah, definitely. How do you normally find out about ethical brands?


Tyler:

With the ethical brands, usually what I'll do is, I'll just go to Google and look up ethical blank for whatever I'm looking for, but, let's say I'm looking for ethical lingerie, If I'm looking for ethical lingerie, I'll type that in, but there's a lot of greenwashing going on in the world. Greenwashing basically... It's really frustrating. But, greenwashing is basically when like brands are pretending to be ethical and they'll just say... They could say on their website because there's no law against saying it unfortunately even if it's not true, but... I'll type in ethical lingerie and then at the bottom, I'll look for like an ethics section and usually the ethical brands are very transparent about where the clothes are made, they dive into their factories, they will share if their factories or their business in general is certified, if the items are cruelty-free, if they're fair trade certified and they dive into a lot of detail on their website. This information is readily available and that's usually a good indicator that they're ethical.


Another way is they have a lot of ethical brand directories that people have made like other bloggers. I have one that I'm working on my website on thriftsandentangles.com, but there's also a website called The Good Trade and they pretty much vetted all the brands for you. So if you're looking for like ethical athleisure, you can go to their website and they kind of have the brands laid out already. But I would always say, of course, do your research yourself. And if you have any questions, you can email the brands directly. And if they are an ethical brand, they'll be able to answer your questions. If you say, who made my clothes, some of the brands can tell you the exact person's name, how much they were paid, just give them the whole breakdown. But some brands that are greenwashing will not give... They might say, "we're ethical, but they won't give you any statistics and you could tell when they're lying.


Ariel:

Yeah. You definitely can tell and it's always suspicious when brands like H&M try to come up with an ethical line and it's like, "Okay, yeah, right."


Tyler:

Gir! Yes! That is a mess. That whole thing and it's like.. Because sustainability is the hot trendy topic right now and people want... Millennials, especially they are more conscious in some of the reports I'm reading about consumerism. And so, brands are like, "Oh, let's make the packaging green and tell them it's eco-friendly or tell them it's compostable." And people will buy it because they don't know. They're trusting the brands and the brands, they know exactly what they're doing, they're just trying to get more money out of us.


Ariel:

Yup. Exactly. It's awful. It's really, it's really bad. I want to shift into your modeling career, I saw on your website that you are modeling for ethical brands. Is it safe to assume that you didn't always do that? And if not, what was the transition into working with more ethical brands?


Tyler:

Yes, of course. You are completely right. When I first started modeling, I started modeling for a boutique in Vegas. I actually worked there as a cashier and then they hired me on as a model and they were definitely a fast fashion boutique. They had cute clothes, trendy pieces that weren't really meant to last long. You would wear them for a month or two and they would get a hole, or you'll wash them and they were shrinks so they really weren't long lasting and they were catered to... If you needed a dress one night in Vegas, buy from us kind of thing but I modeled for them and they are the reason I even got into modeling. They are reason I started wearing my hair natural, all the stuff, I really love that I did get that opportunity to work with them because when they hired me on as a model, I still had a perm and this is me going on a whole different ramp.


Ariel:

That's okay.


Tyler:

I still had a perm and they really wanted, I guess they wanted more diversity too on their page but they really wanted me to have my natural hair and my hair wasn't going to curl cause I had it permanently straightened, but they would ask me all the time, "Can you come with your hair curled?" And I'm like, "Sure." I would go home and curl my hair with a curling iron and show up to set and they were like, "No! We want your natural curly hair." And I was like, "What do you mean? My hair is not naturally curly." They definitely pressured me or pushed me or I don't know, inspired me. I don't know which word to use, but they really were like, "We want you to model, but your hair, we really want it curly for you to model for us." I'm so thankful for them for that.


Tyler:

I was modeling for their website, they had more fast fashion stuff, I was signed to a few agencies in Las Vegas and I modeled for a mall in Colorado, I did a commercial for that. The one thing that made me want to transition is one of the other girls who worked with me at that boutique as a model, she got signed to a really big agency in LA and this is after I had started working on thrifts and tangles and being vocal online about the problems with fast fashion and really inspiring people to try to shopping secondhand first and sharing that message. And so the girl who got signed... Because my dream was to get signed as a model, my dream was to get signed to the same agency she did, if not a similar one. And I would see her online all over Forever 21's website, all over H&M's website, which is an amazing opportunity for her. But I was so conflicted, because I'm like, "My dream is to be a model, get signed with a huge agency like that, but I don't want to be all over Forever 21's website when I'm online, telling people don't shop at Forever 21." That just seems hypocritical to me and it just didn't feel right. And so, I ended up... Randomly, a photographer who I worked with in Vegas. His name is Lucky's Camera, he introduced me to a woman in Vegas who was a jewelry designer and her name is Andrea Donnelly's Jewelry and she makes ethical jewelry. All of her materials were ethically sourced and her items were handmade and I started hand modeling for her and it was just so cool to be able to talk to someone who actually cared about how the items were created and was really passionate about her products and her whole mission was about ethical living and conscious living and it was really cool to connect with someone like that and I wanted to do it on a larger scale because she's just a small maker in Vegas, but I love that I got to work with her. I started researching online for ethical modeling agencies Because I'm like, "There has to be a way where I can still model, but work for brands that are ethical because I'm already doing it." But I was like, "There has to be a way they have an agency to connect me with more ethical brands.


I did a search and I found Role Models Management. They were the only ethical agency that came up. I'm pretty sure they were the only ethical agency in the world or something, it's ridiculous.


Ariel:

Wow!


Tyler:

It's crazy. One of their models came up, she's a vegan model. And I read an article about her, about how she only wants to work with vegan brands and how... I think she talked about her transition and she said, because of this agency, she doesn't have to wear fur anymore as a model and all this stuff. So I was like, "I am going to apply for this agency and try my luck." I submitted my photos; they are located in Los Angeles and I was still in Vegas at the time. And so, I applied for the agency, I sent some photos and the next day they were like, "Can you come to LA? We want to meet you." I drove down to LA, I met them, they saw my blog. And they were like, "We love your blog, we love your mission, we love that you talk about sustainability," and they signed me on the spot, which was amazing.


Ariel:

Wow!


Tyler:

I was so excited. That was my dream. I was like, "Oh my goodness!" I really appreciate my agents because both of my agents, they care so much about like eco-friendly living and they're very vocal about that on their platforms. And they both were models themselves, so they understand what it's like to work for a brand that isn't in alignment with your values. They do their best to connect us with brands that also are focused on, you know, eco-friendly living or veganism or sustainability and I'm just so grateful to have them as my agents.


Ariel:

That's awesome. Oh my gosh! I can't believe you got signed the same day.


Tyler:

I know. I literally was like, "Is this real life?" I went on... Before I started Thrifts and Tangles and I wanted to really be a model, I went to agencies, my boyfriend and I would come to LA three to four times a year on vacation. But while we were here, I would say, "Let's go to an agency and I would go to the big name agencies." And you walk in, you give them your pictures and they go in the back room and show your pictures to whoever looks at it. And then they come out and say, "No, we don't want you." I got turned down so many times from other agents. I was used to being told no and you have to have thick skin as a model because you might not be what they're looking for. But I was so happy because this is the one that actually mattered to me. This is the one that was ethical and so in alignment with everything I was trying to do, so I'm so grateful for them.


Ariel:

Yeah. That's so perfect. I want to go back a minute to you growing out your natural hair. Tell me about that process.


Tyler:

Sure. I went down the YouTube rabbit hole of course. Thank goodness for YouTube! I feel like I wouldn't have been able to go natural besides that. Growing up, I always had my hair natural and my mom was really good about caring for my hair and all this stuff and then in fifth grade, I decided I wanted a perm and she tried to talk me out of it and I was like, "No, I really want perm." I got a perm in fifth grade and then it started being like getting a perm in sixth grade, getting a perm in seventh grade and I was straighten my hair every single day. And it wasn't until, I want to say it was junior year of high school when I was working for that company who wanted me to have my hair curly, I also had a friend who had the most beautiful curly hair and I've never seen anyone wear their curly hair in high school and wear proud and... Everyone had their hair straightened or had it up and tucked away or had braids or something. I've never saw it actually out and curly. And so, I told myself I'm not going to get a perm again. I think I got my last perm, it must have been junior year because that's when they were like, "We want your hair curly." And I was like, "It won't curl, I have a perm."


I started slowly cutting my hair off, slowly transitioning and I would just cut the ends off until it started to look healthy, because they were so damaged, they were like permanently straight and you can't revive a curl after that. During my transition, I did not like how my hair looked curly at all. I would just wear it in a bun every single day and pop a headband on it and say, “That’s it, I look cute, I'm not going to wear this out ever." And I actually modeled for a Paul Mitchell hair show and they dyed my hair hot pink. Yeah. It was crazy. It was hot pink highlights, but they styled it for the curly line and the stylist styled it in a way that looked so cool. Even though my hair was still damaged, the products they used, it made my hair come to life and I was able to see, "Okay, my hair can be cute curly. I just have to know what products to use and wait for the transition to happen." And so, I literally would take pictures every week of my hair so I could see the progress and I would send it to my friend. I'm like, "You're my accountability partner. I'm not going to straighten my hair, I'm going to get through this." And when I see the pictures, now looking back, I'm just so happy I did that because otherwise I would have given up because my hair was so damaged and seeing the little bit of progress between month one to month four, you could tell it was getting way healthier, having those photos were definitely my saving grace.


Ariel:

Yeah. Wow. That's awesome. I saw on your blog that you tried a shampoo bar, how did that go? Because I'm looking for one.


Tyler:

Yeah! So I used - it was by Humpy Organics, the shampoo bar. They sent me this product and I was skeptical. I'm like a a shampoo bar for the curly girls, the sustainable products for the hair are questionable.


Ariel:

Yeah. Right.


Tyler:

I use the shampoo bar and I mean, shampoo...I don't care about shampoo that much. Any shampoo I've used, I feel like it doesn't make a big difference on my hair. It gets my hair clean and that's all that matters to me, but they had a conditioner bar that I did not think was going to work. I used the shampoo bar, it made my hair clean, whatever, I washed it out. I used their conditioner bar, rubbed it on my head a little bit and immediately I had so much slip on my hair. I was like...


Ariel:

What?


Tyler:

Right. I was like, "Did this little bar just do that?" And I was so shocked. I made my boyfriend come and feel my hair and it worked so good. So the first time I used it though, I rinsed it out and my hair was a lot frizzier, so the second time I used it, I left it as a leave-in and I think it says on the directions that that's okay to do. But, using it as a leave-in was a game changer. I was so impressed with this little product. I'm like, "What? This actually works."


Ariel:

Wow. That's awesome. I'll have to try that out then.


Tyler:

Yes. They have a mango breeze scent, it smells really good, but they have other scents too. I think they're sold out right now because of everything going on with coronavirus. I don't know if she's making them because they're made by a small maker and I think she makes them by hand. I was so excited, but I've heard some girls, other curly girls say that they have had good experiences with different conditioner bars. If you're skeptical about that, give it a try because it actually might work.


Ariel:

Yeah. Okay. Yeah, definitely. I have been very skeptical, but you've convinced me. Alright. You said that you have started to kind of cut back on thrifting so much, but I'm wondering what has been your best thrifting find?


Tyler:

So my best there being find is probably...I like fashion and thrifting clothes and stuff. But, when I moved to LA, I needed to decorate my apartment and I wanted to get as many items as I could secondhand. Most of my items are from Ikea, which is not very ethical, but I needed some cheap items and I'm going to have them for a long time. And I'm like, I'm keeping these items forever. I got a lot of the items from the thrift store. My best thrift find is probably a home decor find. I have an apartment tour video on my YouTube video that shows it, but I have a Crosley leather cased record player that I found at Goodwill and it was $20 and it's so beautiful, I love it so much and it actually works. I was so happy about it.


Ariel:

Wow. That's awesome. Oh my gosh.


Tyler:

Yeah, it was a good find. All the home decor pieces. One day I went to Savers and they just had everything in my aesthetic. I was like, "What is going on?" It was like whoever donated their room is exactly my aesthetics. I bought like all of their pieces, but I bought some really cool paintings. I'm really excited about the stuff I was able to thrift. I also thrifted my couch, I got it on OfferUp and it's a sleeper couch. It was $100 and couches are expensive so I was really excited about that. It's probably a tie between my record player and my couch.


Ariel:

Yes. Have you noticed a difference between the thrift stores in Las Vegas and the ones in Los Angeles?


Tyler:

Oh, that's a good question. I would say the thrift stores in LA have a much larger selection and it's just because their population is larger so more people are donating, but Vegas has some really good thrift stores as well. I feel like the thrift stores are both really good, but LA's prices are a little more expensive at certain stores. Goodwill in Vegas, they individually price the items. For a dress, it might be $5 to $10 or whatever and in LA, the Goodwill's price by item type, so all dresses are $10 even if they are a lower quality dress. That's one thing that I've noticed is really different. But, LA has such amazing thrift stores and they still have thrift stores. Their prices aren't crazy. They have some thrift stores where you can get stuff for a dollar in LA. I talked to someone recently who was so shocked by that. She thought because it's in the city, it would be way more expensive, but LA has some really affordable thrift stores as well.


Ariel:

That's good to know. Even though I said earlier that I have been going to thrift stores since childhood, I still feel overwhelmed, and that may be partly because I don't really like shopping in general, but what tips can you give to people who are new to thrifting?


Tyler:

So the first thing I'll say is if you don't like shopping in general, they do have online thrift stores that might make it a little bit less stressful for you because you can actually search for that particular item you want. I would suggest maybe shopping on thredUp or they have Goodwill marketplace where you can buy items. My next tip would be to know your style. Before you buy a single thing, create a Pinterest board and pin...go down the rabbit hole of Pinterest of different outfits and save everything that you think is cute and then analyze your Pinterest board and see, "Okay, what do these items have in common," and develop your style from there. And once you know your style, it makes it so much easier to go thrifting because...and my next tip and going off the same point is don't dig through the racks at the thrift store. You want to slowly walk down the aisles and keep an eye out for something that matches your style. If it's color or texture, if you slowly walked down the aisles, you can eyeball. I like stripes, so if I see something striped, I just slowly walk and I'm like, "Okay, that has stripes so I'll grab it." Don't tire yourself out, don't feel like you have to dig through everything. You can have an eyeball of like "Okay, this is my style, this is what I like." I would say focus on one section at a time. When you walk in, there's so many clothes. Really just conquer one section at a time. If you're going there for a dress, focus on the dresses.


Another point would be, have an idea of what you want to get, because that makes it easier if you can conquer only what you're focused on buying. If you want shoes, just go to the shoes. Another tip is to grab anything cute that catches your eye and put it in your cart. If you're slowly walking down the racks and you see something and you pick it up and you're not sure about it, just throw it in your cart and you can figure it out later if you want it, but you never want to grab an item and put it back and then later on, be like, "Oh, I want the item." And then you go back for it and it's gone or you don't know where you put it and running around. And then my last tip would be to remember that it's okay if you don't find anything, some days are a hit or miss. I know some people get overwhelmed and get really discouraged because maybe they go on one to two thrift trips and they find nothing. But even a an thrift expert, I'll go and I'll leave empty handed, some days they just don't have anything that doesn't mean they'll never have something.


Ariel:

Yeah. Those are awesome tips. Thanks for sharing.


Tyler:

Thank you. Good luck thrifty.


Ariel:

One of the last questions I have Tyler is, what is one simple step that anyone can take to be more sustainable?


Tyler:

One simple step that people can take to be more sustainable is use what you already own and find different ways to use it, maybe upcycle the item. But, I think online there's a lot of messaging about, "Buy this bamboo set of this, buy bamboo this and I fell down that rabbit hole. I saw something about bamboo utensils and I was like, "Okay, I need bamboo utensils," so I bought them and I realized I didn't like them and then later I realized I could've just used the silverware I own and took that with me and I wouldn't have had to spend any money. The most sustainable thing you can do at all is, utilize what you already own. And let's say you have plastic utensils or plastic bags, you could wash those and reuse those, right? There's so many things you could do that will save you money and it is sustainable, but I feel like the larger, mainstream sustainability movement doesn't necessarily acknowledge those things. But, the most sustainable thing you can do is not buy anything new and just use what you have. I would also say, if you do need to buy something, try to go to your thrift store first, because the thrift stores have a ton of stuff. If you need a reusable water bottle, you can probably get them at thrift store, that's really nice for two bucks.


Ariel:

That's true


Tyler:

Right! That would be my other tip.


Ariel:

Yeah. That's awesome. I've seen so many water bottles, brand new at the thrift store, so totally agree. Alright. Well Tyler, thank you so much for joining us. Where can everybody find you?


Tyler:

You guys can find me at thriftsandtangles.com, that is my main blog, but I'm also on YouTube, under Thrifts and Tangles. I am on Instagram @thriftsandtangles and then I'm on Pinterest as well and it's thriftsntangles.


Ariel:

Yay! Thanks so much, Tyler. Everybody, please go follow her. She has the best content. Thanks so much for joining us, Tyler. We really learned a lot from your insight and please go follow her on YouTube and Instagram and her blog.


Tyler:

Thanks for having me.


Ariel:

Thank you so much for listening to The Sustainable Brown Girl Podcast. Be sure to subscribe and share it if you loved it and leave a review. You can find us on Instagram @sustainablebrowngirl and check out our Facebook community, we would love to have you there. Until next time, let's continue to make healthy choices for the health of our planet and the health of our bodies. Thanks for listening.